“Mertz’s work hovers hauntingly in the space between visual art and performance.”
ArtNOW

“Minimalist paintings come to life.”
The Atlanta Journal Constitution

“Wildly inventive”
Entertainment Weekly

“It’s more profound simplicity from Mertz, a subtly astonishing choreographer.”
The Atlanta Journal Constitution

“The New York-born, Knoxville-bred dynamo Gabrielle Ondine Mertz is reimagining dance in the cradle of the South.”
Entertainment Weekly

“If Gabrielle O. Mertz hadn't become a choreographer, she surely would have been a sculptor. As a molder of moving bodies, [she] creates images that hypnotize (sometimes creepily so) with a beautiful stillness.”
The Atlanta Journal Constitution

“There's the meeting of the eyes, the meaningful look. Breath catches and eyelids flutter shut. Finally, the kiss: unique, simple, extraordinary. Like snowflakes, no two are ever alike. Under the direction and choreography of Gabrielle O. Mertz, Kiss carves out space and time to examine the stuff human relationships are made of.”
Creative Loafing

“Deadpan, quirky greatness”
The Atlanta Journal Constitution

“So you want to be a rock 'n' roll star? Maybe you won't, once you see Gabrielle O. Mertz's meditation on the vanity and solipsism of the trade (Two Rock Stars). Or maybe you will: That's part of the fun of Mertz's choreography, which can tread that thin line between satire and intellectual knowingness.”
The Atlanta Journal Constitution

Named Best Choreographer & Critic’s Choice
Creative Loafing

“No moment was ever less mesmerizing than the last.”
The Atlanta Journal Constitution

“Evocative and beautiful”
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“Gabrielle O. Mertz must run a grueling rehearsal. As evidenced by last night's evening of three works by Ondine and Company, of which Mertz is director and sole choreographer, she is a perfectionist of the first order. Mertz's brand of modern is not merely one of precision. In her sculptural body constructions and movement—which is often floorbound, yet seems to flirt with gravity—virtually every toe has something interesting to do. This is particularly the case in Opera, a new trio whose final image is haunting—one dancer rolling into the wings in a tangle of arms while another swims in slow motion, her legs hovering, fluttering. This is not to say Mertz's dancers get bogged down in detail. In fact, there is a mind-boggling abundance of expression in the minimalist curl of those toes or a sharp, angled foot that sets a torso into a sideward, undulating free fall.”
The Atlanta Journal Constitution